When dishonesty leads to trust: Moral judgments biased by self-interest are truly believed

Konrad Bocian , Wiesław Baryła , Bogdan Wojciszke

Abstract

Research has shown that cheating is perceived as immoral when it serves the cheater’s interests, though it can be seen as moral when it serves the interests of the perceiver. However, are such biased moral judgments real, or are they merely lip service? To answer the question of whether biased moral judgments actually inform behavior, the authors asked participants to observe a confederate who either cheated for money or did not cheat, which benefited either the confederate alone or both the confederate and the participating observer. Then, participants evaluated the confederate and, finally, played a one shot trust game with her. Cheating influenced moral judgments and decreased behavioral trust, but this only occurred when self-interest was not involved. When self-interest was involved, participants showed no significant differences in trust levels, independent of whether the confederate had cheated or not. Implications for the dual process theory in moral psychology are discussed.
Author Konrad Bocian (Wydział Zamiejscowy w Sopocie)
Konrad Bocian,,
- Wydział Zamiejscowy w Sopocie
, Wiesław Baryła (Wydział Zamiejscowy w Sopocie)
Wiesław Baryła,,
- Wydział Zamiejscowy w Sopocie
, Bogdan Wojciszke (Wydział Zamiejscowy w Sopocie)
Bogdan Wojciszke,,
- Wydział Zamiejscowy w Sopocie
Journal seriesPolish Psychological Bulletin, ISSN 0079-2993, e-ISSN 1641-7844, (B 15 pkt)
Issue year2016
Vol47
No3
Pages366-372
Publication size in sheets0.5
Keywords in English moral judgments, self-interest bias, cheating, trust
ASJC Classification3200 General Psychology
DOIDOI:10.1515/ppb-2016-0043
URL https://www.degruyter.com/downloadpdf/j/ppb.2016.47.issue-3/ppb-2016-0043/ppb-2016-0043.xml
Languageen angielski
File
When Dishonesty_wojciszke_2016.pdf 304.09 KB
Baryła_when dishonesty_oświadczenie.jpg 375.31 KB
Bocian_when dishonesty_2016_oświ.jpg 371.65 KB
Score (nominal)15
Publication indicators Scopus SNIP (Source Normalised Impact per Paper): 2016 = 0.251
Citation count*6 (2020-09-28)
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